Seminar Courses

These are additional seminar courses that Concourse runs (typically in the Spring) that all students are invited to.

  • Twist, Warp, Stitch and Glue: Textile Art(s) and the Making of Culture (ES.S50)
    Some time between 30,000 and 40,000 years ago the people of the Upper Paleolithic began sculpting ivory and bone, making beads for adornment and painting on cave walls.  They also began making string: the twisting together of short natural fibers to the length and thickness desired, from thread to rope and everything in between.  All at once (archeologically speaking) was born knotting (for nets), weaving (for textiles), and sewing (for clothing and so much more).  In this seminar we will explore the range of practical and artistic heirs to the ‘string revolution,’ and the many ways in which they have shaped human culture.  Come prepared to work with both fibers and textiles, to make a project that weaves history with the present and expresses your place in the web of human society.
  • The World is Current: Are You? (Special Subject)
    Do you want to know more about what is going on in the world outside of MIT?  Are you interested in the issues that will inform political debates abroad and at home?  Would you like to discuss the European refugee crisis or the future of the Euro?  How should we address the security crises that radiate out from a number of hot spots around the globe? How do grass-roots movements, like the tea party or Occupy Wall Street, affect public discourse, and what constitutes just public policy anyway?  Join Concourse students and faculty to read some major newspapers together and discuss the pressing issues of the day. During election years, we will hold an election night event so that those who are interested can watch the results roll in together.
  • Continuing Conversations (CC.012)
    Close reading and vigorous discussion of an important book or theme, chosen to explore philosophical, ethical, and political questions that span the ages and disciplines. Readings and themes vary by term. Past examples include Aristotle’s Physics, Plato’s dialogue on knowledge, the Theaetetus, and a variety of writings that exemplify liberalism and conservatism in the American tradition. Preference to Concourse students.